Level 6

Sustainability and Global Citizenship BSc (Hons)

Duration Age Group Study Year Cost Available Locations
3 YEARS ADULT FULL TIME 2021
£8,500 per year * Southend Campus
Duration Age Group Study Year Cost Available Locations
3 YEARS ADULT FULL TIME 2021
£8,500 per year * Southend Campus

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Overview

Course code: LF81

Important: This course is subject to validation by the University of East Anglia (UEA).

The philosophy of the degree is that, through the knowledge and skills they gain, students will be able to act as global citizens, making informed choices for positive change and thus contributing to sustainability. The programme is built upon a multi-disciplinary approach to sustainable development with an underlying ethos that environmental, political, social and cultural aspects of sustainability and global citizenship are interwoven and interdependent. By studying these aspects and the inter-related nature of them, students will gain a holistic understanding of sustainability and what contributions ‘global citizens’ can make to sustainable practices. Each of these themes is developed in breadth – via the variety of contexts of the programme modules – and in depth, exploring and engaging with the concepts and themes in more detail through the three years.

The degree has a philosophy of enabling students to apply theoretical knowledge to current issues pertinent to sustainability. This is achieved via the use of case-studies and consideration of contemporary issues in both the indicative content and assessment of each module. Additionally, application of knowledge is reinforced via the work-based placement and field-based practice.

The second, and complementary, ethos of the degree is to provide graduates with the skills needed to be valuable employees in the sustainable-development sector and as potential post-graduate students in the scientific community. In this respect, the teaching methods, indicative content and assessment methods are deliberately chosen for students to develop and practice their verbal and written communication skills in ways which will enhance their professional skill set. The breadth of topics covered in the degree gives students an introduction to the diversity of careers and sectors which they can work within as graduates. Using case-studies, undertaking visits and introducing students to guest speakers and professionals will enable them to develop both personal and scientific opinion as to the key needs for sustainability; additionally, they will be able to make decisions as to which of the many career paths available they will want to pursue.

Throughout the design and delivery of the modules, all aspects and materials will be consistently viewed through the three critical lenses of theory, application and professional development, to promote the ongoing personal development and commitment required to complete the programme.

A copy of the rules and regulations governing the University of East Anglia course is available here

Entry Requirements

A Minimum of 64 UCAS Points from one or more of the following:

  • At least two A-levels
  • BTEC Level 3 Extended Diploma/Diploma/Subsidiary Diploma/Certificate
  • BTEC National Award/Certificate/Diploma
  • International Baccalaureate
  • Access to Higher Education Diploma (a minimum 15 credits at Merit or above)

For any qualification not identified above the HE Admission Team will determine equivalences through UKNARIC.

You will also need GCSE English and Maths at grade C (old specification) or Grade 4 (new specification) or above OR a Level 2 equivalent such as functional skills.

International applicants

If English is not your first language you will need an IELTS score of 7.0, with a minimum score of 6.5 in each component (Reading, Writing, Listening and Speaking), or an equivalent English Language qualification.

Additional requirements

Credit transfer and accreditation of prior learning or experience:

If you have achieved a qualification such as a foundation degree or HND, or have gained credit another higher education institution, you may be able to enter the course at level 5 or level 6.

Other qualifications and relevant work experience may also count for academic credit. Further information is available at in the Higher Education Admissions Policy & APL Policy for students studying on the University of East Anglia degree.

Course Structure

Year one

What is Sustainability?

To teach the principles which underpin the concept of ‘sustainability’ and how these are reflected in the UN Sustainability Development Goals 2030 and Aichi Biodiversity targets. The module provides a broad foundation to the course by examining the key elements which contribute to sustainability and the environmental, political, cultural and social aspects of these.

Protectors of the Planet

This module seeks to challenge students to be self-reflective and recognise their own standpoint and approach to sustainability. The module will then examine different viewpoints about sustainability and where responsibility for sustainable practices lies- the individual, communities, governments and business. The module will include a sustainability project in which students study and report on the environmental and economic costs of a personal change they make with regards to sustainable practice.

Topical Issues

This is a dynamic module which will examine current issues in the popular press, scientific journals and social media platforms. Students will be encouraged to identify bias in reporting, analyse the use of each method of communication by different sectors and to produce their own reports in a variety of formats representing their own and contrasting stand-points. This will dovetail into the ‘protectors of the planet’ module and will provide a solid foundation for writing for an audience in their research methods, fieldwork, dissertation and in future employment.

Introduction to Research Methods

This module provides a foundation to understand qualitative and quantitative data, its analysis and interpretation. This will be a theory-based element in which students are taught to use statistical and qualitative techniques and be introduced to software packages which will facilitate their analysis. They will then apply these techniques to critically evaluate news reports, headlines and scientific articles.

Work-Based Learning & Placement

The purpose of this module is to effectively underpin and deepen learning across the programme through highlighting transferable skills for employment.  The students will be encouraged to develop skills and qualities that are essential to be an effective academic within Higher Education and a potential employee within the occupations relevant to sustainability. The module will have a theory-based introduction which will feed into a work-based placement for each student in a relevant area. The students will complete a work-placement diary in which they reflect on their current skill set and those they need to develop further to be competitive in the world of work. The module will be enhanced by guest-speakers from a variety of relevant employers.

Year two

Humans and the Sea

This module will examine the history, current use and future of humans’ relationship with the sea. It will focus on exploitation of natural resources, resource-management and tourism. It will be supplemented by local fieldwork / visits to investigate the local fishing industry, water quality and the impacts of tourism. This will be in conjunction with stakeholders to the programme.

Humans and the Land

This module will examine the history, current state and future of human use and exploitation of the land in terms of agriculture, farming, green spaces, transport and urbanisation. It will be in conjunction with stakeholders to the programme and will explore local and global challenges and potential solutions.

The Business of Sustainability

This module will build on the ‘protectors of the planet’ module in year 1 and will specifically explore the role of NGOs, governments and corporations in sustainable practice. It will examine the national and international frameworks and legal obligations within which these institutions operate and the challenges associated with enforcement of the requirements.

Humans and Health

The purpose of this module is to look at the history of the discovery and diagnoses of diseases and bring this into a current context to examine the current challenges to health personally, nationally and globally. It will examine topics such as antibiotic resistance, epidemics and pandemics and the use and distribution of pharmaceuticals. This will challenge students to re-examine their understanding of sustainability and frame their understanding in the context of the sustainability of healthy populations and the wider impact of this on the environment.

Field-based practice

This module will involve a field trip during which students will be actively engaged in a community-based sustainability project. It is hoped that this will be with the support of COAST (Isle of Arran) where students will be able to undertake a short-term (one week) project within the COAST team. This will be the ideal opportunity to draw together their learning thus far about the scientific, social and political aspects of sustainable practice. They will be able to witness grass-roots actions which have had a significant positive impact on the biological, physical and economic environment. Their report about the field-work will enable them to use their qualitative and quantitative data analysis skills (building on year 1) and the placement and report will both offer excellent skills development for future employability.

Year three

Final Major Project (Dissertation)

To provide students with the opportunity to demonstrate a sustained and critical engagement with a selected topic area or action research project. All projects will be chosen in collaboration with staff. Students will be encouraged to draw from each of the disciplinary strands in order to produce a contextualised and fully synthesised response to the Sustainability and Global Citizenship programme.

Life on Planet Earth

This module will seek to answer the questions “what is the value of biodiversity and its conservation?”. Students will use case-studies to explore the decision making involved when stakeholders have conflicting viewpoints such as prioritising the conservation value of a species vs. ensuring the availability of that species as a food source. The module presents the opportunity for debating and public-speaking skills to be developed with a view to preparing students for interviews when applying to graduate placements.

Technology and Sustainability

Is technology a blessing or a curse? What is the carbon footprint left by ‘the cloud’? Is social media a vehicle for change or a source of pseud-information? Will technology contribute to or detract from sustainability in the future? These are questions the students will explore during this module, which will also offer an opportunity to further develop their qualitative research techniques.

Future Solutions

This module will examine the cutting-edge solutions being developed to ensure sustainability in the 21st century and beyond. Students will assess how local initiatives can have a global impact and whether globalisation and sustainability are mutually exclusive. They will draw on the technology and sustainability modules, their field work and their work placements to examine what the world of work will look like in the future and how sustainable practices are changing the landscape of employment.

Work placements

Work placements are encouraged throughout the duration of the course. However work placement as a course requirement is part of the module ‘Work-Based Learning and Placement’ during the 1st year. Work placements are to be negotiated with students and external employers using the standardised placement learning processes and therefore may vary in duration and length.

Timetables

Timetables are normally available one month prior to registration, though we endeavour to let you know an outline as soon as possible. Please note that we make every effort to ensure timetables are as student friendly as possible, scheduled teaching can take place on any day during the week . 

Typically timetables are scheduled for 13 hours per week across 2 days between 9am-5pm (however there may be events during the year, for example, guest speakers that may run until 6pm). We expect students to build on their learning through independent study for which we have space available within the campus or at the Forum in Southend. 

Work Placement

Placements form part of the 1st year module ‘Work-Related Practice’. Work placements that form part of this module are to be negotiated with students and external employers using the standardised placement learning processes and therefore may vary in duration and length.

Overall workload

Across each year of the degree programme you will study 120 credits, this is split into 20, 30 or 40 credit modules. Each 10 credits equate to approximately 100 hours of taught and independent study. Class contact hours of 13 per week are included on the scheduled timetable, in addition independent study time, including assessment activity and group work, will equate to approximately 26 hours of independent learning per week across all studied modules in one year. 
 
Level 4

Total Timetabled Scheduled Hours per year: 390
Total Hours Taught Per Year: 360
Total Hours Tutorial: 30
Total Independent Learning/Assessment: 810 (Approximately 130 hours per module/4 hours per week)

Approximately 30% per cent of your time is spent in timetabled teaching and learning activity, with 70% of your time spent in guided independent study.

Level 5

Total Timetabled Scheduled Hours per year: 390
Total Hours Taught Per Year: 360
Total Hours Tutorial: 30
Total Independent Learning/Assessment: 810 (Approximately 130 hours per module/4 hours per week)

Approximately 30% per cent of your time is spent in timetabled teaching and learning activity, with 53% of your time spent in guided independent study and 17% of time on placements.

Level 6

Total Timetabled Scheduled Hours per year: 390
Total Hours Taught Per Year: 360 (including 4 hours Timetabled Activity for Final Major Project/Dissertation)
Total Hours Tutorial: 30
Total Independent Learning/Assessment: 810 (Approximately 130 hours per module/4 hours per week)

Approximately 25% per cent of your time is spent in timetabled teaching and learning activity, with 75% of your time spent in guided independent study.
 

Teaching & Learning

Teaching

You are taught through a combination of lectures, seminars and workshops, which enable you to discuss and develop your understanding of the disciplines of Sustainability and Global Citizenship. 

Typically across all years of the programme you will have 13 hours of contact time per week across two days. Contact time will consist of:

  • Two-four hour lectures/seminars
  • Tutorial and dedicated 1-2-1 support when necessary

Independent learning

When not attending lectures, seminars or workshops or other timetabled sessions you will be expected to continue to learn independently through self-guided, independent activities. This may typically include reading journal articles, books, periodicals and preparing coursework and presentations. A range of excellent facilities, including the library and online learning resources, the Learning Resource Centre and the Forum supports your independent learning. Typically Independent learning will approximately equate to 70% in Year one and 53% in Year two (with 17% making up Placement Learning) and 75% in Year three.

Assessment & Feedback

Assessment

Across the programme students are assessed using a variety of methods including; Essays, Research Projects, Presentations, Case Studies and Research Reports. Please note that full assessment information can be found in the module descriptors.  

Percentage of the course assessed by coursework

Year 1
100% coursework (please refer to the module descriptors for assessment methods)

Year 2
100% coursework (please refer to the module descriptors for assessment methods)

Year 3
100% coursework (please refer to the module descriptors for assessment methods)

Feedback

You will receive formative feedback as part of your modules and taught sessions with your Module Lead. You will also receive summative comments on all formal assessments undertaken by coursework. Written feedback is provided to students within 20 working days of submission through Turnitin. Alternative forms of feedback can be requested by students through 1-2-1 meetings with Module Assessors/Module Leaders. 

Feedback on the Final Major Project/Dissertation module in Year 3 is provided throughout and through supervision meetings as scheduled.

Academic Support

Our Academic Support Team provides help in the following areas:

  • Study skills (including reading, note-taking and presentation skills)
  • Written English (including punctuation and grammatical accuracy)
  • Academic Writing (including how to reference)
  • Critical Thinking and understanding arguments
  • Revision, assessment and examination skills (including time management)

Our Senior Learning Mentor can provide advice and guidance for students with additional needs resulting from disabilities.

Teaching staff

You will be taught by an experienced team whose expertise and knowledge are closely matched to the content of the modules on the course.

Course Cost

Adult, full_time: £8,500 per year

Fees are per academic year for Home/UK students.

The following course-related costs are included in the fees

  • When students are required to produce a poster presentations to conference expectations as part of assessment criteria then the professional printing of this poster will be provided through the Central Reprographics Unit at the College;
  • You will receive an allocation of pages for printing. Once you have used your allocation, you need to charge up your account with more pages. This can be done using a Credit\Debit card via a web interface (http://student-print.southessex.ac.uk/safecom). There is a minimum charge of £10 using this method, or using the printer charging cash machine located in the learning centres;
  • Essential costs related to compulsory field-work and visits.

The following course-related costs are not included in the fees

  • Students are expected to equip themselves with the necessary stationary required for successful study;
  • Textbooks are provided through the library and the College continually reviews availability however students may wish to purchase their own textbooks;
  • Optional Trips are likely to be arranged (both day and residential) to support your studies. It is likely that the majority of the trips arranged will be local and therefore students should factor in train fares and related costs at approximately £120 per year. These will be organised where required to enhance the learning experience;
  • Independent trips to assist (e.g. the final major project (Dissertation)) are encouraged where necessary but will need to be funded by the student;
  • Travel costs to practice placements should be funded by the student, however support for travel can be requested from student support services where a student’s meets the support criteria;
  • You will receive an allocation of pages for printing. Once you have used your allocation, you need to charge up your account with more pages. This can be done using a Credit\Debit card via a web interface (http://student-print.southessex.ac.uk/safecom). There is a minimum charge of £10 using this method, or using the printer charging cash machine located in the learning centres.

Accommodation and living costs not included in the fees

This information can be obtained from our Accommodation Services home page.

Sources of financial support

If you receive funding from Student Finance you may be eligible to apply for additional benefits.
Details can be obtained from our Student Services home page.